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Secession and the Civil War

A cautious and limited use of force, a strategy of inactivity to buy time to resolve the conflict, a strategy designed to make the Confederacy loo like the aggressor if war occurred, and a strategy designed to avoid any "hostile" action toward the South by the Norh were all applied to Lincoln's initial policy toward the Confederacy.  Prohibition of protective tariffs, guarantee of slavery, protection of slavery in the territories, and restrictions on the finance of internal improvements. In the beginning, the Civil War was a struggle to preserve the Union. To secure the necessary troops for the war, the South resorted to the draft, and the North resorted to the draft. Lincoln and Davis learned early in the war that successful conduct of the war required active, executive leadership. The Emancipation Proclamation freed only slaves in the Confederacy. Confederate leaders were confident of British recognition, because British textile mills were so dependent on Southern cotton.

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