Make your own free website on Tripod.com

jwilliams3016

Home | Question's | Chapter 16 Summary | Chapter 1 Summary | Chapter 17 Summary | Chapter 18 Summary | Chapter 19 Summary | Chapter 20 Summary | Chapter 21 Summary | Chapter 22 Summary | Chapter 23 Summary | Chapter 24 Summary | Chapter 25 Summary | Chapter 26 Summary | Chapter 27 Summary | Chapter 28 Summary | Chapter 29 Summary | Chapter 30 Summary | Chapter 31 Summary | Chapter 32 Summary | Chapter 11 Summary | Chapter 12 Summary | Chapter 13 Summary | Chapter 14 Summary | Chapter 15 Summary | Chapter 5 Summary | Chapter 6 Summary | Chapter 7 Summary | Chapter 8 Summary | Chapter 9 Summary | Chapter 10 Summary | All About Me | Favorite Links | Chapter Summary 4 | Chapter 2 Summary | Chapter 3 Summary | Resume | Contact Me








Slaves and Master

Elite group of whites dominated the South society and made profits on the labor of slaves of African origin, who developed a rich culture of their own. Slavery's hold on the South was strengthened by the increasing impotance of short-staple cotton. During the nineteenth century, the center of cotton production shifted rapidly westward. A leading advocate of the need for southern selt-sufficiency was J.D.B. DeBow. At the time of the Civil War, one quarter of white southerners owned slaves. The yeoman farmer of the South was proud and self-reliant. Southern proslavery arguments did include the belief that slaver was the natural status for blacks, sanctioned by the Bible, consistent with the humanitarian spirit, and eventually going to  become unnecessary. Southern apologists claimed the master-slave relationship was more humane than employer-worker relationships bbecause it afforded greater long-term security. The conspiracy for slave rebellion incovered in South Carolina in 1822 was led by Denmark Vesey. The foundation of the African American culture was religion. Free African Americans in the South were actively involved in helping fugitive slaves.

Enter content here



Enter supporting content here